Difference between revisions of "Sweep Edit"

From IRC Improv Wiki
Jump to: navigation, search

Deprecated: The each() function is deprecated. This message will be suppressed on further calls in /home/customer/www/wiki.improvresourcecenter.com/public_html/includes/diff/DairikiDiff.php on line 438

Deprecated: assert(): Calling assert() with a string argument is deprecated in /home/customer/www/wiki.improvresourcecenter.com/public_html/includes/diff/DairikiDiff.php on line 441
(New page: A sweep edit is a form of editing a scene in which a player, either in the scene or on the backline, walks or runs across the front of the action of the scene, ending the scene completely.)
 
 
(4 intermediate revisions by 4 users not shown)
Line 1: Line 1:
A sweep edit is a form of editing a scene in which a player, either in the scene or on the backline, walks or runs across the front of the action of the scene, ending the scene completely.
+
{{Stub}}
 +
A '''sweep edit''' is the most commonly used [[edit]] in longform improvisational theatre. They are sometimes referred to as "'''swipes'''" or "'''wipes'''."
 +
 
 +
==Description==
 +
To sweep edit, a player, either in the scene or offstage, walks or runs across the front of the action of the scene, ending the scene completely and beginning a new one. Followed by the [[tag edit]], it is by far the most popular method of editing, being employed in standard [[Harolds]], [[Armandos]], and [[Montages]].
 +
 
 +
==See also==
 +
*[[List of edits]]
 +
*[[Tag edit]]
 +
 
 +
[[Category:Concepts]][[Category:Editing Techniques]]
 +
[[Category:All]]

Latest revision as of 06:16, 7 January 2015

This article is a stub. Help the wiki grow by editing it and adding more information.

A sweep edit is the most commonly used edit in longform improvisational theatre. They are sometimes referred to as "swipes" or "wipes."

Description

To sweep edit, a player, either in the scene or offstage, walks or runs across the front of the action of the scene, ending the scene completely and beginning a new one. Followed by the tag edit, it is by far the most popular method of editing, being employed in standard Harolds, Armandos, and Montages.

See also